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OpenStack Was Key To Building Its Servers.Com Service, Says XBT

Tuesday, 01 September 2015 - 14:08 PM - (Enterprise)

When XBT Holding S.A. decided to simplify how its subsidiaries provided global hosting, network solutions, and web development they turned to the open source cloud infrastructure platform OpenStack.  

xbt-logoWhen XBT Holding S.A. decided to simplify how its subsidiaries provided global hosting, network solutions, and web development they turned to the open source cloud infrastructure platform OpenStack. By consolidating the offerings under a single service provider, Servers.com, customers can more easily browse, mix, compare and choose the most suitable services.

"Our companies provide many different services ranging from low latency VPS to powerful enterprise dedicated servers," said Rajesh Kumar Mishra, Chief Financial Officer of XBT, when Servers.com was announced in March. "However, until now to benefit from these services, a customer would have to contact the particular company, without any knowledge of the other options.”

To create and manage this multi-faceted offering required powerful, capable, reliable software -- preferable as a "stack" of components engineered to work together.

OpenStack provided the flexibility XBT needed to marry all of its services. The Apache-licensed platform is a collection of interrelated projects used to control and manage data center resources like processing, storage, and networking. It can thus be configured in many ways to create private or public clouds, and works with enterprise and open source technologies – making it ideal for heterogeneous infrastructure.

"We wanted an open-source platform, so we could tune services for customer needs, said Nick Dvas, Project Manager for Servers.com. "And we wanted a solution that could scale up for carrier-grade activity, and integrate with other open and proprietary enterprise environments."

It also needed to be stable and robust. Currently, XBT's companies have over 1,000 racks of gear in five data centers and are managing more than 16,000 servers. Servers.com customers have their choice of servers, based on Dell hardware, that run from single through quad-CPU, four through 12 cores, and anywhere from 32 to 768 gigabytes (GB) of RAM, and 14 drives. Applications for Servers.com cloud, cloud server, and cloud storage services include e-commerce, gaming, finance, and development.

Servers.com takes advantage of XBT's existing physical infrastructure, Dvas is quick to point out. "We have state-of-the-art private networking, including 10 GB to every server in our data centers in Dallas and Amsterdam. We can offer private networks between dedicated bare-metal and cloud servers among other options.”

Servers-datacenter-1

OpenStack for Flexibility, Reliability, Scalability

XBT acquired the Servers.com domain name in December 2013, and active development of Servers.com as a product offering was started in the fall of 2014, Dvas said. In March 2015, XBT announced that Servers.com was "in the final stage of development."

"OpenStack was mature enough to be used to build clouds -- and at that time, OpenStack was the only open platform with sufficiently mature quality," says Dvas. "We looked at other options, like CloudStack. But we didn't see any real alternative in the market that met our requirements.  OpenStack allows us to build compute and storage platforms that are secure, reliable, and scalable to serve as public and private cloud. We still consider OpenStack the only open platform of sufficient quality."

OpenStack's open-source status was very important in XBT's selection, Dvas notes. No other cloud platform would allow service providers to build public clouds out of the box, he said.

“Closed-source enterprise level cloud platforms like VMware, or Microsoft Hyper-V, are built and designed for private clouds,” Dvas said. “If you're creating public, service-provider clouds, it is very important to have much more scalability, and the possibility of integration between other services of the same service provider, and the cloud platform. For example, we needed to be able to integrate our bare-metal offerings with our cloud services."

"We would have considered other options -- closed-source -- if they met our requirements at the time," Dvas acknowledges. "But there was no perfect fit in the closed-source world. We had to be able to modify. So we embraced OpenStack."

XBT is no stranger to open source software, says Dvas. "Our customers have been using, and we have been managing, open source systems, like Linux and BSD. We've been actively using OpenStack components like Neutron for networking, and Swift for storage.”

They have also been contributing to OpenStack and have sent employees to the last two OpenStack Summits as technical contributors.

"We recently contributed a significant improvement to a metering agent for the Neutron networking plug-in," notes Dvas.

Other open source components in use at XBT, says Dvas, "include the Nginx web server behind XBT's content delivery/distribution network (CDN), helping us serve large amounts -- hundreds of gigabits per second -- of traffic. We use BackOffice as the management system that provides fulfillment of servers, and on top of the OpenStack cloud. And I'm personally a heavy user of the Vim text editor, I spend about half my day with it open in a terminal window -- not for editing code, but as a to-do list manager."

Lessons Learned, And Other Advice

For customers, "it's important to know that OpenStack is a mature technology," says Dvas. "When managed by a proper operational team, and handled with sufficient care by your service provider, OpenStack is secure, and reliable, and allows you the same amount of scalability and features as any other platform."

For others in the industry, e.g., other cloud builders, "implementing OpenStack requires skilled engineers, and you may need to do a lot of development to adapt OpenStack to your needs," Dvas cautions. "That's one reason we offer to the professional services to our largest customers to do the building of private clouds for them, if they need that done, rather than have them do it themselves."

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Linux Foundation Puts Free Chromebooks in the Hands of its Training Students Throughout September

Tuesday, 01 September 2015 - 13:35 PM - (Software)

 

As students make their way back to the computer lab and professionals dig in post-summer, Linux Foundation offers free Chromebooks to individuals who enroll in Linux training during the month of September.

As students make their way back to the computer lab and professionals dig in post-summer, Linux Foundation offers free Chromebooks to individuals who enroll in Linux training during the month of September.

The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux and collaborative development, today announced it will give away one Chromebook to every person who enrolls in Linux Foundation training courses during September. Individual learners are eligible for this offer, which begins today and expires at 11:59 p.m. PT on September 30, 2015. All courses available for enrollment this month are offered through the end of the year, giving students flexibility in scheduling.

Read more at The Linux Foundation

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Webroot Launches IoT Toolkit to Protect Connected Home Devices

Tuesday, 01 September 2015 - 13:00 PM - (Software)

A new layer of defence for protecting connected home devices against cyberattack has been created through Webroot's IoT tools.

A new layer of defence for protecting connected home devices against cyberattack has been created through Webroot's IoT tools. 

The Internet of Things (IoT) and networked devices include smart thermostats, self-driving cars, home security system and home lighting, among others. Many of the IoT devices available on the market can be controlled through mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets which has pushed electronics makers to new heights and allowed for more innovative products -- but the moment you connect a device to the Web, you forge a gateway...
Read more at ZDNet News

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Linux 4.3 Scheduler Change "Potentially Affects Every SMP Workload In Existence"

Tuesday, 01 September 2015 - 08:02 AM - (Software)

Aside from Ingo Molnar's x86 boot changes he sent in to Linus Torvalds for the Linux 4.3 merge window, he also sent in the scheduler changes for this next version of the Linux kernel.

Aside from Ingo Molnar's x86 boot changes he sent in to Linus Torvalds for the Linux 4.3 merge window, he also sent in the scheduler changes for this next version of the Linux kernel. 

With Linux 4.3 for those running any sort of SMP (Symmetric Multi-Processing) workloads, the performance could sway one way or another, but hopefully it's for the better. Here's the key part of Molnar's pull request for the 4.3 scheduler changes: 

The biggest change in this cycle is the rewrite of the main SMP load balancing metric: the CPU load/utilization...

Read more at Phoronix

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CUPS 2.1.0 Officially Released With Support For 3D Printers, IPP Everywhere, More

Tuesday, 01 September 2015 - 02:10 AM - (Hardware)

The CUPS (Common UNIX Printing System) open-source and cross-platform printing system for GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems reached version 2.1 after being in development for approximately three months. 

CUPSThe CUPS (Common UNIX Printing System) open-source and cross-platform printing system for GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems reached version 2.1 after being in development for approximately three months.

The software has received support for basic 3D printers based on the PWG White Paper policy and template, addresses multiple issues in the handling for journald, it fixes support for domain sockets on Linux systems, and adds better support for the systemd init system and service manager.

Read more at Softpedia Linux Blog

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OpenBSD Is Getting Its Own Native Hypervisor

Monday, 31 August 2015 - 19:54 PM - (Software)

The OpenBSD Foundation has been funding work on a project to provide OpenBSD with its own, native hypervisor.

The OpenBSD Foundation has been funding work on a project to provide OpenBSD with its own, native hypervisor. The hypervisor's VMM is so far able to launch a kernel and ask for a root file-system, but beyond that, it's been laying most of the hypervisor foundation up to this point.

Read more at Phoronix

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Using tshark to Watch and Inspect Network Traffic

Monday, 31 August 2015 - 18:53 PM - (Security)

Most of you probably have heard of Wireshark, a very popular and capable network protocol analyzer. What you may not know is that there exists a console version of Wireshark called tshark. The two main advantages of tshark are that it can be used in scripts and on a remote computer through an SSH connection. more>>

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Exclusive Interview: Michael Miller of SUSE Talks About Transition and Contributing to Open Source

Monday, 31 August 2015 - 16:59 PM - (Enterprise)

SUSE is one of the Linux trinity -- which comprises Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical. SUSE is also one of the leading contributors to many open source projects, including the kernel itself. However, the company went through challenging times...

suse-logo-2SUSE is one of the Linux trinity -- which comprises Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical. SUSE is also one of the leading contributors to many open source projects, including the kernel itself. However, the company went through challenging times as it was acquired by one company after another. It seems that things have stabilized with the Micro Focus acquisition, so I sat down with Michael Miller, SUSE’s Vice President of Global Alliances & Marketing at LinuxCon and talked about topics ranging from acquisition to future plans.

Swapnil Bhartiya: SUSE has been through a lot of transition lately since it was acquired by Micro Focus. How much has changed or improved under the new company?

Michael Miller: Acquisition by Micro Focus has been a great thing for SUSE. They are very aware of SUSE's growth potential and the dynamic market we are in. They like the growth they have seen in SUSE, which is part of what transpired the transition. They have been making investments into the business since the acquisition. I would say that they love what they saw in SUSE, and after the acquisition they have given us great support. They kept our SUSE leadership team intact -- with Nils Brauckmann, President & General Manager and his team completely the same as it has been now for years, working together.

SB: How much and what kind of independence does SUSE has in Micro Focus?

MM: We operate as an independent product unit within Micro Focus company. They recognized that, as an open source company and operating system and OpenStack distribution vendor, there are a lot of differences between SUSE business and rest of the Micro Focus business. They are very aware of that, so we are operating very much like we did prior to the acquisition, only now we are part of a larger, very stable, very profitable company where we can actually receive the benefit of all those things and investments in our business that will really help us grow.

SB: We can clearly see that post-acquisition SUSE is doing a lot of things, but has your focus changed? What are the areas SUSE is focusing now?

MM: We are a very practical company. We are interested in areas that focus on enterprise customers that we serve and do those things really, really well with high degree of quality, performance and service. Then, we are open to partnering. So by focusing on areas where we really can make a difference, we can then partner in additional areas.

The three main areas we are focusing on are: enterprise Linux, which is our historical area of strength; OpenStack private cloud for the enterprise; and then software-defined distributed storage, building on Ceph as the upstream project. There is great opportunity to bring those three things together in a very interesting way, and then partnering with both hardware vendors and software vendors to create a variety of choice of solutions for our customers.

SB: SUSE is one of the leading contributors in the open source world. Has the acquisition changed anything in terms of contribution?

MM: As a result of acquisition, we are actually contributing more to the open source projects that we care about. Because we are growing -- we are growing the business and we are also growing the engineering organization. If you go to SUSE.com today you will see a huge list of open positions for engineers; we are hiring like crazy all across the board -- OpenStack, security, storage, kernel, etc. We are starting to engage in a whole series of new projects. One area I am really excited for us getting involved in is Cloud Foundry. So you will start to see SUSE folks engage with the Cloud Foundry in the near future as well.

SB: At LinuxCon IBM announced their LinuxONE systems, what kind of partnership is there between SUSE and IBM on mainframe?

MM: You know, SUSE and IBM worked together for some 15 to 20 years ago to first bring Linux to the mainframe. SUSE Linux was the first distribution on the mainframe and that was developed by a very deep engineering relationship. And we have kept that depth of engineering collaboration with IBM ever since. What we have announced this week, I think, is just the latest in a long series of innovations we have done together. As you heard in the announcement, KVM for the IBM z Systems is fully supported by SUSE and IBM and available on the new LinuxONE servers; we are the only Linux distribution available right now with full support for that virtualization platform.

SB: I will talk about containers a bit. There are two competing technologies -- Docker and Rocket by CoreOS, which seemed bad for containers. It's good that they are now working together to create some standards through The Open Container Initiative. From what I know, SUSE has partnered only with Docker. What is your perspective on this?

MM: We joined the Open Container Initiative, which was announced at DockerCon recently. It’s very important to us that we find a way for all this to work together to move the technology forward towards enterprise stability, manageability, and security. We want to prevent fragmentation that will slow down that process. So we are keeping an eye on all these things that are going on, but we are absolutely committed to working together with all those vendors in the ecosystem to focus on core standards and moving the bar forwards. We don't want to be duplicating one another's efforts and fragmenting what's going to be a great technology. I want to move it faster, get it to the enterprise where people can put it to work.

SB: Both Red Hat and Canonical have their offerings such as Project Atomic and Snappy Ubuntu. What does SUSE have in this space?

MM: We have been doing small footprint Linux for years; we have Just Enough Operating System. And we have great tools such as SUSE Studio where you can produce exactly the configuration and packages, just the amount of operating system you need, for the environment you are targeting. We think that the combination of tooling and manageability that we can provide actually matches up with what enterprise customers are going to want around containers.

SB: Let's move from containers to IoT. Where is SUSE in the IoT landscape?

MM: Internet of Things is a fascinating topic and there is a lot of talk about that. Our interest in IoT is the server side. There are devices all around the world but they are generating a massive amount of information and data that needs to be stored, processed and be acted upon. We are working very closely with partners like SAP helping build an ecosystem of ISVs, developing against big data analytics platforms like Hadoop and Hana. That’s where our focus has been.

SB: So, it's all on the server side and not on the client side?

MM: Correct.

SB: And will the focus change?

MM: Currently we are squarely focused on enterprise server side.

SB: SUSE recently announced their ARM 64 partner program. Big companies like PayPal have deployed ARM datacenters. What kind of market do you see for ARM 64?

MM: We think it’s fairly early days for ARM 64. We are very enthusiastic about it. We have both silicon vendors and systems vendors that joined our program, actively working on the engineering together. And I think the target markets will emerge over the next few years.

SB: SUSE had close relationship with Microsoft for a long time. What are the areas where the two companies are still working together?

MM: We have great partnership with Microsoft, and it has evolved over the years. The things that we are actively working on together include hypervisor -- Hyper-V integration with OpenStack. There is mutual certification that Windows runs within our private cloud infrastructure on our servers and vice versa. So you can run SUSE Linux inside of Microsoft's private or public cloud. We have a great partnership with the Azure team where SUSE is the only commercially supported enterprise Linux on Azure. There are a lot of things we are doing together with them that drive that public cloud, hybrid cloud story forward in a way that supports mixed, heterogenous environments.

SB: Events like LinuxCon play a very pivotal role in bringing different players together under one roof. Is SUSE planning any events to engage with partners and customers?

MMillerMM: SUSECon is our customer, partner, end-user event we hold every year. This year, we are organizing it in Amsterdam, from November 2 through 6. We will have a whole series of very technical, educational sessions, hands-on labs and training. There will be a lot of sessions that are represented by customers and partners on a whole range of open source topics -- from enterprise Linux to public cloud, private cloud, hybrid cloud, OpenStack, Ceph storage, Docker and container. You can also come to the event and do Linux certification classes and tests and actually leave the event with a Linux certification in your hands.

SB: The Linux Foundation is doing a lot of courses; do you also run such courses?

MM: We are actually developing more and more training courses. Just this year, we have a fairly wide range of training courses; we have three levels of certification programs and we are adding to that curriculum. We are actually going to start expanding our certification model to work with specialization around subjects like private cloud and storage. Here at LinuxCon, we have been speaking with the Linux Foundation Training and Certification team. At some point in future, not too far, we will be announcing some collaboration between SUSE Training Certification and the Linux Foundation.

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How to Jump From Cloud to Cloud

Monday, 31 August 2015 - 16:33 PM - (Enterprise)

In 2010, when Netflix was still early into its shift from DVD rentals to online movies and shows, it started using Amazon.com’s data centers.

In 2010, when Netflix was still early into its shift from DVD rentals to online movies and shows, it started using Amazon.com’s data centers. Video streaming’s popularity was growing fast, and Amazon Web Services, the retailer’s cloud computing division, had the capacity to handle the load. Now that Netflix streams 100 million-plus hours of video every day, it’s sticking with Amazon partly because of Amazon’s scale and features, and partly because switching vendors “would be a significant multiyear effort,” ...

Read more at Bloomberg Businessweek

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The Growing Waves In the Linux Ecosystem: Two Perspectives

Monday, 31 August 2015 - 13:00 PM - (Enterprise)

In the early 1990s, the Open Software Foundation formed a committee to select and standardize a new Management Platform Toolset for and from the UNIX ecosystem. After much soul searching over a few months, the OSF Management Platform never arrived. 

foxtech-logoEditors’ Note: This article is sponsored and written by Fox Technologies.

In the early 1990s, the Open Software Foundation formed a committee to select and standardize a new Management Platform Toolset for and from the UNIX ecosystem. After much soul searching over a few months, the OSF Management Platform never arrived. One member of the committee, from the team that invented The Newcastle Connection (1980s *NIX history, go Google it) made a compelling presentation explaining why they failed. Presenting from two very different perspectives, he had the audience full of system administrators rolling with laughter at the answers drawn from an OSF selection team executive and a sysadmin working in the trenches.

The Latest Linux Wave

Since you’re reading this article, you will have your own perspective on the Linux ecosystem. A lot has changed even in the last year; we’re experiencing a massive wave of Linux take-on via virtualization and the cloud as accelerators.  New companies are growing from 10 servers to 10,000 instances in two or three years. For older customers, however, we’re also living with a legacy of old infrastructure decisions made (for some) decades ago, some pre-Linux.

In the middle of all this is you -- that rare and finite resource, the Linux admins. You may be a manager (who was an admin grunt when decisions were made years ago), or you may be a grunt on the front line right now.  In the same tone as that meeting in the early 1990s, let’s apply those two viewpoints to the following statistics:

The good news: Linux is on the up and moving like a freight train. 87% or organizations added Linux servers this year. About the same will add more Linux next year. Windows deployment has fallen from 46% to 26%

A manager might say: The organization took a strategic decision last year to standardize on Open Systems Infrastructure to manage our asset and cost base more efficiently, streamlining technical and operational silos.

A sysadmin might say: Let’s be honest, we’re migrating to Linux VMs and Linux in the cloud to save money. The business may have LIKED Windows server in the past, but Microsoft’s licensing mechanisms seem to be purposely designed not to work in virtualized and cloud infrastructures, unless the business has gone Azure. And if that had happened I wouldn’t be here.  We’re already expected to support twice as many server instances as we did before, and to be honest expect to see that will rise again without our team growing at all, so we’re going to need more automation.

And Its Squeaky Wheels

A worldwide, year-long survey of what people are ACTUALLY doing with their infrastructure is just moving into its second year. FoxT will be presenting their first year results formally over the next few weeks, obviously tied into their sales and marketing efforts.

Some valid commentary that can be made on some of the initial raw data, both as a manager and a sys admin. Beyond the marketing and positive news of new companies and projects going live in the ecosystem worldwide, there are some acerbic and wry grumblings over a few (Ed: A few??) beers and margaritas at Linux user group meetings. Your admins are talking, and it’s not all good news.

Here are four quick samples of the annoying squeaky wheels we’re dealing with as the ecosystem grows.

1. 70% of organizations worldwide use LDAPS and Kerberos for secure authentication

Manager: It is encouraging that industry best-practice is being utilised by the majority of the ecosystem for LDAP based (48%) and Kerberos (21%) authentication, providing centralization and control of user and session access.

Sysadmin: A couple of things here

  • What the survey also says is 10% of larger enterprises are still using NIS and NIS+. Mainly larger, global companies (many web-facing) still have not migrated away from NIS, even though it has been End-Of-Lifed a while ago.  I follow the news, if those servers are already penetrated, our host, group and user information is zipping around in the clear. Does the Board appreciate that?\
  • If I’m running or migrating into a G-Cloud, which requires complete separation between infrastructure layers then LDAP and Kerberos break the rules because they both have to be pervasive for authentication on all network layers for the support teams to work. We have to start bridging networks and adding strange proxies, breaking the G-Cloud architectural model.

2. 50% still manage Linux privilege escalation with Internally Developed Solutions

Manager: We’re making effective use of existing toolsets to ensure we can audit privileged escalation, and show evidence to our System Owners and Auditors. Extending some of our existing Configuration Management and Operational reporting tools we have saved the business from investing in a commercial product, or purchasing an additional service from our business partners.

Sysadmin: Internal, as in non-standard, maybe non-best-practice (I can’t remember the last time we updated our rules), untrained (in the unlikely event we do get another or have to replace a team member), and badly documented. Most damningly, it’s unaudited and violating segregation of duties.  My team maintains and supports this stuff, and it’s my team’s activities that are being monitored. Do you see the problem?

3. Over half of organizations worldwide provision and deprovision their Linux servers manually

Manager: This is scary - I was pretty shocked when I saw this result. I see 44% use tools to enable automatic account and group provisioning which is encouraging, we interact with new customers and projects all the time recommending best practice to use automation or IAM tools to enable this. Obviously, from these results we still have a long way to go; we need to keep evangelising, and especially with smaller customers.

Sysadmin: That’s a huge number of guys and girls still doing essential operational tasks to make sure critical applications are setup properly. Not the most inspiring part of my day, let me tell you, and probably assigned to the most junior team member on shift, who might miss something.   Remember that NIS directory we turned off last year because we were told to by the auditors? Now we now have no control of UID/GID consistency.  If we do add automation, it may take months to fix that system by system before we get any benefits; you’re going to see that as a cost, not an efficiency saving.

4. 71% or organizations worldwide plan to use Red Hat Enterprise, Ubuntu Enterprise, or SUSE Enterprise Linux in the next year

Manager: The Linux ecosystem is maturing, and the positive trend of customers migrating to Enterprise Linux editions for rollout into their production infrastructures shows this. Even with an exploding Linux installed base, organizations are seeking business-level assurance provided by the maintenance and SLAs provided by Enterprise Editions from the vendors.

Sysadmin: Ok, we used (CentOS/Debian/openSUSE) as a startup, and this move makes a lot of sense, change and patch management integrated with automation is v. good.   

Boss, I need to take you out for a beer and a chat. Looking at this, there is going to be a lot of market competition for trained staff. Let’s talk about training and certification. We’re going to need to formally train and certify a chunk of the admin team before we do this to meet the vendor’s minimum SLA requirements. Off the cuff, that will take an ongoing FTE of two out of support for a few months. Do you have the budget to hire some consultants to cover that?

And talking about budget, about my next review...

What do you think? Heard something similar? Obviously, we’ve all seen the positive strides Linux has made in market share worldwide, and it is a nice feeling to be part of a growing trade that values our skills. That has its own pressures, especially on staffing and day-to-day operations. FoxT is an infosecurity company, so many of their questions are in that area, however I’m sure similar grumbles exist in configuration management, operational monitoring, and deployment.

DDingwallFox Technologies, Inc. helps companies protect corporate information assets with network security and access management software as well as striving to simplify compliance and streamline administration with an access management and privileged account control solution. Fox Technologies’ access management software centrally enforces granular access entitlements in real time across diverse server environments. Enforce more security, manage more servers, and become more efficient – with BoKS ServerControl: www.foxt.com/boks

 

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Second Alpha Build of Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 Brings LibreOffice 5, Based on Debian 8

Monday, 31 August 2015 - 06:47 AM - (Software)

Edward Snyder, the creator and maintainer of the Debian-based Liquid Lemur Linux distribution, has announced the release and immediate availability for download of the second Alpha build of the upcoming Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 distro. 

liquid-lemurEdward Snyder, the creator and maintainer of the Debian-based Liquid Lemur Linux distribution, has announced the release and immediate availability for download of the second Alpha build of the upcoming Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 distro.

Being based on Debian GNU/Linux 8 (Jessie), Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 Alpha 2 comes with the final version of the LibreOffice 5.0... 

Read more at Softpedia Linux Blog

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The 4.2 Kernel Has Been Released

Sunday, 30 August 2015 - 22:25 PM - (Software)

Linus has announced the final release of the 4.2 kernel. "So judging by how little happened this week, it wouldn't have been a mistake to release 4.2 last week after all, but hey, there's certainly a few fixes here...

Linus has announced the final release of the 4.2 kernel. "So judging by how little happened this week, it wouldn't have been a mistake to release 4.2 last week after all, but hey, there's certainly a few fixes here, and it's not like delaying 4.2 for a week should have caused any problems either." Headline features in this release include the security module stacking patches, the delay-gradient congestion-control algorithm, improvements to writeback management in control groups, a lot of important persistent-memory infrastructure, and more.

Read more at LWN

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How Apache Spark Is Transforming Big Data Processing, Development

Sunday, 30 August 2015 - 15:27 PM - (Enterprise)

Apache Spark speeds up big data processing by a factor of 10 to 100 and simplifies app development to such a degree that developers call it a "game changer."...

Apache Spark speeds up big data processing by a factor of 10 to 100 and simplifies app development to such a degree that developers call it a "game changer."  Apache Spark is an open source data processing engine built for speed, ease of use and sophisticated analytics. Spark is designed to perform both batch processing and new workloads like streaming, interactive queries, and machine learning.

Read more at eWeek

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This Week in Linux News: Linux Turns 24, Zemlin Discusses Microsoft at LinuxCon, and More

Friday, 28 August 2015 - 14:00 PM - (Software)

This week in Linux news, Linux celebrates its 24th birthday, Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin discusses Microsoft's growing involvement with the foundation and more! Read up on the latest in Linux news from this past week.

King penguins on Possession Island- Stefano Unterthiner

This week in Linux news, Linux celebrates its 24th birthday, Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin discusses Microsoft's growing involvement with the foundation and more! Read up on the latest in Linux news from this past week.

1) Linus Torvalds shares the Linux origin story in honor of its 24th birthday. 

How Linux Was Born, As Told By Linus Torvalds Himself- Ars Technica

2) Linux Foundation-hosted Core Infrastructure Initiative launches new security badge program.

Linux Foundation to Launch New Security-Focused Badge Program for Open-Source Software- Softpedia

3) KDE's Plasma 5.4 "continues to show the prowess of this ‘leaderless’ community."

KDE's Plasma 5.4: The Most Advanced and Beautiful Linux Desktop- ITWorld

4) Beloved PC games become Linux natives.

Linux Gaming Rising: 32 Killer Games for Steam Machines and Linux- PCWorld

5) Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin discusses Microsoft's growing participation in OSS initiatives.

Microsoft Shows Up in Full Force at LinuxCon- eWeek

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BitTorrent Patched Against Flaw That Allowed Crippling DoS Attacks

Friday, 28 August 2015 - 13:28 PM - (Software)

Vulnerability in open BitTorrent protocol amplified attacks as much as 120 times.

Vulnerability in open BitTorrent protocol amplified attacks as much as 120 times.

The maintainers of the open BitTorrent protocol for file sharing have fixed a vulnerability that allowed lone attackers with only modest resources to take down large sites using a new form of denial-of-service attack. The technique was disclosed two weeks ago in a research paper submitted to the 9th Usenix Workshop on Offensive Technologies. By sending vulnerable BitTorrent applications maliciously modified data,...

Read more at Ars Technica

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