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More Secure SSH Connections

Monday, 31 March 2014 - 19:45 PM - (Security)

If you need remote access to a machine, you'll probably use SSH, and for a good reason. The secure shell protocol uses modern cryptography methods to provide privacy and confidentiality, even over an unsecured, unsafe network, such as the Internet. more>>

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Why Arguing That Windows is Better Than Linux Makes You Look Silly

Friday, 28 March 2014 - 17:36 PM - (Software)

Every article I have read, in recent memory, arguing that “Windows is better than Linux” makes the author sound a little bit, for lack of a better word, like a big giant goober.

Bryan-LundukeIt seems as though you can't throw a rock on the internet without hitting an article which argues for the superiority of Windows over Linux. With titles like “Five reasons I'd rather run Windows 8 than Linux”, these articles are a dime a dozen.

Truth be told, I've written my fair share of “Why X is better than Y” articles over the years (almost always arguing in favor of the superiority of Linux-based systems). They're fun to write. They're easy to write. And, perhaps most important, they're somewhat cathartic to write. Have a hard week where you've been forced to use a platform you don't particularly like? Write an article about how it's worse than one you do like. It's good for the soul.

Are these sorts of articles a wee bit pointless? Sure. It's really just preaching to the choir, so to speak. But they're fun to read. They're almost like the tech-nerd equivalent of a gossip rag. I read 'em. You read 'em. We all read 'em (even if we pretend like we don't). But I have noticed something rather interesting about these sorts of articles...

Every article I have read, in recent memory, arguing that “Windows is better than Linux” makes the author sound a little bit, for lack of a better word, like a big giant goober. A raging, loopy goober. The points that writers of these articles use to back up their hypotheses tend to be just plain silly and poorly thought out. They're really scraping the bottom of the barrel, looking for any possible evidence – no matter how ridiculous – to prove the superiority of Windows over Linux.

[“Hey, Bryan! I've got an idea. Why don't you try insulting a bunch of talented technology journalists, some of whom are your friends, by calling them 'raging, loopy goobers'?” Great idea, personage I just created for the sole purpose of asking myself a hypothetical question. Consider it done!]

Here. Let me show you what I'm talking about. What follows is the very first reason given, for why Windows is superior, in a recent ZDNet article by David Gewirtz:

1. “Reason #1: As soon as you mention one distro, all the fanboys go insane claiming you've made the wrong choice.”

You didn't just hallucinate.

The #1 reason to not use Linux, stated by a technology writer for both ZDNet and CNN, is that other people use Linux also. Some of those people have opinions. And you, with your obvious inability to exist within a universe with other people in it, will simply collapse into a fetal position and give up using computers altogether.

Bottom of the barrel reasoning. Heck. Not even in the barrel. In a box next to the barrel with the words “just some fish or something” scribbled on the top with a sharpie. But let's jump past that relatively catastrophic level of goobery-ness and tackle some of the more reasonable (at first glance) points that are made in many of these sorts of articles.

2. “Windows has more software.”

One of the common mantras in making the case against Linux, particularly on the Desktop, is that Windows simply has more software available than Linux. In fact, I don't even think you can use the phrase “Windows is better than Linux” in an article without trotting out this tired old argument.

This is usually backed up by an example of an important piece of software that doesn't run on Linux, such as Adobe Photoshop.

There's just one problem with that argument: It's not at all true. Want to run Adobe Photoshop (or the vast majority of software often used to make this argument)... you can. With Wine.

Sure, you could make the argument that not all Windows software runs perfectly using Wine on Linux. Then again... I could make that same argument about Windows software not always running well on Windows itself. Which would be a far more damning point to make. And, because I'm not the type to kick a guy when he's down, I'm just going to move on...

3. “Windows has more commercial support.”

This one gets pulled out fairly often.

The idea here is that people and companies want professional support – the ability to pick up the phone and call someone when they have a problem. This is, obviously, super critical. Especially for big businesses who have mission-critical work happening on their computers.

When this gets written, I feel like the writer wasn't even trying. This argument is immediately disproven by a quick Google search for “linux enterprise support” and checking out the number of options on that first page of results alone. Multiple high profile companies offering various support options for both Linux servers and desktops.

In other words, “Lots and lots of commercial support for Linux”.

4. “Windows is pre-installed.”

Ah, now here's a valid point. At least it would be, if installing operating systems were difficult at this point in human history. It also assumes nobody has ever had to re-install Windows which, I am pretty sure, is a task that has been done at least 50 times by every man, woman and child on planet Earth (on average).

Also... the logic here is “You already have this thing... so don't worry about that other thing that might be better. Also buy some new versions of the thing you have. But, seriously. Don't think about other, better things.”

5. “Windows is easier to use.”

The core of the argument here usually revolves around how it is impossible to use Linux without spending all day hunched over the terminal and typing archaic commands into Emacs. Which is both completely wrong (Linux desktop distros tend to be astoundingly easy to use nowadays), and also a wee bit insulting for the reader.

If a person is reading a technology article comparing two different operating systems... my guess is they don't have a panic attack the moment they need to type two words on their keyboard. I know, call me crazy.

I could go on and on with this but I think the point has been made. It sort of feels like all of these “X Reasons Windows is Better than Linux” articles are regurgitated versions of similar articles written in 1998. And, in the end, simply make the writers look uninformed about Linux.

Also goobery. It makes them look a bit goobery.

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Xen Virtualization Has Many New Features Coming

Friday, 28 March 2014 - 17:05 PM - (Enterprise)

Xen 4.4 was released earlier this month and this big virtualization update shipped many new features, but there's even more exciting features currently under development...

Xen 4.4 was released earlier this month and this big virtualization update shipped many new features, but there's even more exciting features currently under development...

Read more at Phoronix

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Red Hat Serves Up Good Earnings, Updated Virtualization Platform

Friday, 28 March 2014 - 14:53 PM - (Enterprise)

Red Hat is out with a slew of news this week. As Susan covered earlier, the company reported better-than-expected quarterly results, aided by strong subscription growth for its Linux operating system, but also forecast full-year profit following below average analyst estimates. Along with that news, the company announced the Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4 Beta, which builds on the recent Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.3 release, and aims to automate enterprise virtualization tasks while providing integration with OpenStack. 

Red Hat is out with a slew of news this week. As Susan covered earlier, the company reported better-than-expected quarterly results, aided by strong subscription growth for its Linux operating system, but also forecast full-year profit following below average analyst estimates. Along with that news, the company announced the Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4 Beta, which builds on the recent Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.3 release, and aims to automate enterprise virtualization tasks while providing integration with OpenStack.


 
Read more at Ostatic

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The Future is Now: Revolutionizing Product Design Through Intel Technology

Friday, 28 March 2014 - 14:00 PM - (Hardware)

In the past decade, developers and programmers have ushered in a digital revolution. But Tomorrow Lab, a New York-based product design and development consultancy, is using its work in product design and engineering to bring about the next great technological revolution. The brainchild of Ted Ullrich, Pepin Gelardi, and Dean...

In the past decade, developers and programmers have ushered in a digital revolution. But Tomorrow Lab, a New York-based product design and development consultancy, is using its work in product design and engineering to bring about the next great technological revolution. The brainchild of Ted Ullrich, Pepin Gelardi, and Dean Dipietro, Tomorrow Lab is focused on prototyping new hardware and smart technologies that improve our everyday lives.

Continue reading…

Read more at The Verge

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Distribution Release: Musix GNU+Linux 3.0.1

Friday, 28 March 2014 - 12:59 PM - (Software)

Marcos Guglielmetti has announced the availability of Musix GNU+Linux 3.0.1, an update to the Debian-based distribution designed for musicians.

Marcos Guglielmetti has announced the availability of Musix GNU+Linux 3.0.1, an update to the Debian-based distribution designed for musicians: "The development team of Musix GNU+Linux is proud to present version 3.0.1 Stable. This is a bugfix release related to installation fail due to lack of grub package. 

Read more at DistroWatch

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NVIDIA Will Support Newly-Dropped GPUs On Linux Through 2019

Friday, 28 March 2014 - 12:54 PM - (Hardware)

Earlier this month we found out NVIDIA would be dropping pre-Fermi support from their mainline graphics driver on Windows and Linux. For Linux users, we have some good news about NVIDIA's Linux support plans...

Earlier this month we found out NVIDIA would be dropping pre-Fermi support from their mainline graphics driver on Windows and Linux. For Linux users, we have some good news about NVIDIA's Linux support plans...

Read more at Phoronix

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KDE Ships Release Candidate of Applications and Platform 4.13

Friday, 28 March 2014 - 10:37 AM - (Software)

KDE has released the release candidate of the 4.13 versions of Applications and Development Platform. 

KDE has released the release candidate of the 4.13 versions of Applications and Development Platform. With API, dependency and feature freezes in place, the focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing. We kindly request your assistance with finding and fixing issues.

A partial list of improvements can be found in the 4.13 Feature Plan. A more complete list of the improvements and changes will be available for the final release in the middle of April.

 

    Read more at KDE.news

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    University Course Teaches Computer-Human Interaction With Open Hardware and OSS

    Friday, 28 March 2014 - 08:00 AM - (Hardware)

    Most people think of their interactions with computer systems to occur via a keyboard, mouse, or touchscreen. However, humans evolved to interact with thier environment and each other in much more intricate ways. Bridging the gap between the computational systems of the digital world and the natural world is being studied...

    open hardware class

    Most people think of their interactions with computer systems to occur via a keyboard, mouse, or touchscreen. However, humans evolved to interact with thier environment and each other in much more intricate ways. Bridging the gap between the computational systems of the digital world and the natural world is being studied and tested in the Physical Computing course at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany.

    As a professor of the course, we are currently leveraging a variety of open source software and hardware projects to learn about fundamental core concepts with hands-on experiences and implementation of open source tools. On the software side, we use an open-source IDE (Arduino Sketch) and develop 3D printer designs using OpenSCAD. On the open source hardware portion of the course, we utilize the Arduinos and the PrintrBot Simple.

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    Read more at OpenSource.com

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    Linux 3.14 Isn't Going To Make It Into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

    Friday, 28 March 2014 - 06:34 AM - (Software)

    The Ubuntu 14.04 LTS kernel freeze is less than one week and it looks like by all indications are that the Linux 3.14 kernel will not make it for the next Ubuntu LTS release...

    The Ubuntu 14.04 LTS kernel freeze is less than one week and it looks like by all indications are that the Linux 3.14 kernel will not make it for the next Ubuntu LTS release...

    Read more at Phoronix

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    Jolla's Sailfish OS Is Now Available For Google's Nexus 4

    Friday, 28 March 2014 - 04:15 AM - (Mobile)

    Jolla's Sailfish operating system is now available for those that wish to run their ported Mer-based mobile Linux platform on Google Nexus 4 smart-phones...

    Read more at Phoronix

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    Intel Thunderbolt Is Still A Pain For Linux Developers, Users

    Thursday, 27 March 2014 - 15:03 PM - (Software)

    While Thunderbolt was promising from a technology perspective, it hasn't seen too much adoption outside of Apple systems and the Linux support is still plaguing developers and causing nightmares among Linux users...

    While Thunderbolt was promising from a technology perspective, it hasn't seen too much adoption outside of Apple systems and the Linux support is still plaguing developers and causing nightmares among Linux users...

    Read more at Phoronix

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    The Linux Foundation Presents Results of Collaborative Development Study

    Thursday, 27 March 2014 - 14:57 PM - (Enterprise)

    The Linux Foundation has announced the release of its first “Collaborative Development Trends Report,” which presents the results of an invitation-only survey of nearly 700 software developers and business managers about their participation and investments in collaborative development practices. 

    The Linux Foundation has announced the release of its first “Collaborative Development Trends Report,” which presents the results of an invitation-only survey of nearly 700 software developers and business managers about their participation and investments in collaborative development practices. The complete report is now downloadable online, and is released in conjunction with The Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit in Napa, Calif. The report shows strong growth for collaborative development projects and more investments made in them.

    According to the announcement: 

    "The rise of Linux and open source tools and components in the enterprise software industry over the past decade has been well documented. More recently, a new business model has emerged in which companies are joining together across industries to share development resources and build common open source code bases on which they can differentiate their own products and services. This collaborative approach is transforming industries from cloud computing and the datacenter, to automotive and mobile computing, and creating the next generation of technologies. The Linux kernel community pioneered this approach to software development and their success has helped to inspire the spread of collaborative methods to other industries and technologies."

     

    Read more at Ostatic

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    Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4 Beta: On-Ramp to Cloud Computing

    Thursday, 27 March 2014 - 14:30 PM - (Software)

    Red Hat begins beta test of RHEV 3.4, an enhanced KVM virtual machine designed to continue simplifying and automating enterprise virtualization tasks while providing an on-ramp and a seamless integration with OpenStack.

    Red Hat begins beta test of RHEV 3.4, an enhanced KVM virtual machine designed to continue simplifying and automating enterprise virtualization tasks while providing an on-ramp and a seamless integration with OpenStack.

    Read more at Enterprise Open Source Toolkit

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    Dell Agrees to Pay Microsoft Royalties for Android, Chrome OS

    Thursday, 27 March 2014 - 12:03 PM - (Enterprise)

    The duo agreed on “royalties for Dell’s products running the Android or Chrome platforms and on consideration to Dell for a license for Xbox gaming consoles.” The post Dell agrees to pay Microsoft royalties for Android, Chrome OS appeared first on Muktware.

    The duo agreed on “royalties for Dell’s products running the Android or Chrome platforms and on consideration to Dell for a license for Xbox gaming consoles.”

    Read more at Muktware

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